Jobs of a Preschooler · Ramblings · Themed Books

Nature Walk: How Many Butterflies and Moths?

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I receive a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase.)

I had mentioned in a previous post that your little ones can be scientists by taking a nature walk to make some fun discoveries. I have talked about finding tracks, nests, and interesting creatures before. Today, I thought it would be fun to search for butterflies and moths.

Although I am definitely not a lepidopterist (a person who studies moths or butterflies), there are some books that provide details about moths and butterflies.

Books about Moths and Butterflies

Butterflies and Moths: Explore Nature with Fun Facts and Activities by DK

Butterfly or Moth?: How Do You Know by Melissa Stewart

Butterflies and Moths by David Carter

Moth and Butterfly Search

Typically, moths have fat feathery antennae, and butterflies have slender antennae with “balls” at the tips. Butterflies are often found during the day, whereas moths often prefer nights. Butterflies make chrysalises, and moths make cocoons.

This is a picture of a monarch butterfly we found on a trail we were walking on one day. Did you know you can tell a male and female monarch butterfly apart by looking at the markings on the wings when they are open? The males have black spots, and the females don’t.

These caterpillars shown on the milkweed plants are not technically butterflies (yet), but it is fun to see the different stages of a butterfly. Did you know monarch caterpillars can only eat milkweed plants?

monarch caterpillars on milkweed

I took the caterpillar picture at a monarch butterfly event we attended. Families were allowed to take home a caterpillar to raise and later release.

The book How to Raise Monarch Butterflies by Carol Pasternak is a great resource if you would like to raise your own monarch butterflies.

Some nature centers allow visitors to help tag monarch butterflies. The small tags help track monarchs during their long migration. More information about monarch tagging can be found on Monarch Watch.

I think this is an eastern tiger swallowtail. We were walking and saw it along the side of a road.

If you know what this guy is, please let me know.

A moth, a beetle, and a fly all flew on to a tree…

butterfly, beetle, and fly

…and then I took a picture.

Speaking of butterflies and flies, another book to check out is I, Fly by Bridget Heos about a fly that feels underappreciated. He thinks butterflies get too much attention, so he attempts to enlighten a classroom full of kids about flies. Readers learn quite a few facts about flies through the fly’s humorous discussion.

How many butterflies and moths can you find?

Here are some more posts you may be interested in reading:

Nature Walk: Whose Tracks Are These?

Nature Walk: Where Will You Find a Nest?

14 Children’s Books About Flowers

14 Children’s Books About Seeds, Plants, and Gardening

 

Jobs of a Preschooler · Writing Appearances

Easter Eggsperiment and Projects

It can be a lot of fun celebrating holidays! Will you be celebrating Easter in just a few weeks?

If so, you may enjoy 2 simple Easter egg painting projects my daughters and I did together, which I wrote about and had published on Hands On As We Grow.

Easter Project with Painted Eggs and Paper

It took a little bit of trial and error to figure out exactly how we wanted to do the projects, but we had a lot of fun and the results were beautiful.

You may also enjoy doing an Easter Eggsperiment.

My daughters and I have enjoyed doing science experiments, and I think the floating egg experiment is the perfect science experiment for Easter.

Jobs of a Preschooler- I'm a scientist...

“I’m a scientist…” from the book Jobs of a Preschooler.

This eggsperiment causes eggs to rise in water and float, which reminds me of Jesus rising from the dead- the reason Christians celebrate Easter to begin with.

If you would like to do an Easter Eggsperiment, gather the following supplies:

  • tall clear glass
  • 1 egg
  • salt
  • water
  • spoon
  • measuring cups
  • measuring teaspoon

Once you have your supplies, follow these steps:

  • Fill glass with 1 1/2 cups cold water.
  • Put egg in glass.
  • Notice what happens to the egg. It should sink to the bottom of the glass. The egg is denser than the fresh water, so it sinks. But how do you make the egg rise?

Can you make the egg float?

  • Take the egg out of the glass.
  • Add 1 tsp salt.
  • Stir until dissolved.
  • Put egg back in glass.
  • Notice what happens to the egg. Did it rise at all?
  • Follow the same steps: take egg out of glass, add 1 tsp salt, put egg back in glass, and notice what happens to the egg 1 tsp of salt at at a time until the egg is floating.

But, why does the egg float when the salt is added?

Salt water is more dense than fresh water. As you add salt, you will notice the egg will begin to rise because the water is becoming denser than the egg. The egg becomes buoyant.

You can check out this 3 1/2 minute video for kids that explains buoyancy and what makes things float for an extended explanation. (From 2:16-2:22, it does show a simple drawing of Archimedes from the back running naked.)

We decided to take the experiment further and  tried two different kinds of salt-iodized salt and regular salt- in two separate glasses.

Here are our results after adding 4 tsp of salt to each glass.

Making an Egg Float in Water

It was interesting to us that it required more to get the egg in the iodized salt to rise.  Here are our results after adding 7 tsp of salt to each glass.

Making an Egg Float in Water

Will you try this eggsperiment at home?

 

Check out these posts for more simple science fun at home:

 

Jobs of a Preschooler · Pickles, Pickles, I Like Pickles · Ramblings

10 Cookbooks for Kids

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. Thank you!)

Does your family have a favorite TV show you watch together?

My family enjoys watching MasterChef Junior, and I have been trying to find out when the new season will premiere. A while back, I had read it was going to start on February 26th this year.

But it didn’t.

Now, it appears it should be starting again on March 12th. I guess we will see if that date is correct. It is amazing to watch children between the ages of eight and thirteen create such elegant dishes. Especially when they use ingredients I don’t even recognize!

I enjoy watching how the kids often band together and encourage one another even though they are competing against each other. They are still competitive, but they are also compassionate.

Sometimes, I wish I could taste test the dishes the contestants have created. Other times, not so much.

from book Jobs of a Preschooler...preschooler being a taste tester

Be a taste tester like the girl in the book Jobs of a Preschooler.

I don’t think I could handle the challenging task of being a judge. The emotions of the kids when they are eliminated can be quite heartbreaking, and I don’t think I would want that responsibility.

My daughters and I do enjoy baking and creating foods together, and it is not uncommon to hear my daughters discussing with one another whether or not our food dishes are “MasterChef worthy”.

Typically they are not. And when they might be, it is probably because we found a good recipe to follow step-by-step and didn’t mess up.

If you have ever seen the show, you may know a Mystery Box Challenge is when the contestants have a large crate they can not see through in front of them flipped upside down. When the contestants are given permission, they lift the crate to discover an assortment of ingredients they use to make a dish.

A few years ago, we celebrated the start of the MasterChef Junior season with our own Mystery Box Challenge. My girls were nervous as they lifted the crate because they had no idea what I was going to have them create.

I think they were pleasantly surprised when they lifted the lid and found vanilla ice cream, marshmallows, M&Ms, cookies, chocolate syrup, chocolate chips, saltine crackers, nuts, and a few other items that could be used as toppings on ice cream.

So, it wasn’t a true Mystery Box Challenge. I didn’t have them cook or bake anything, and I didn’t taste test either of their creations.  But we still had fun.

From book Jobs of a Preschooler...Preschooler being a chef

Be a chef like the girl in the book Jobs of a Preschooler.

This is a picture of one of their creations. It had vanilla ice cream, chocolate syrup, marshmallows, M&Ms, and broken cream filled cookies mixed together.

ice cream creation

Unfortunately, I can’t find the picture of my other daughter’s creation. I personally would have prefered vanilla ice cream, chocolate syrup, chocolate chips, and crushed saltine crackers mixed together.

Yes, crushed saltine crackers in my ice cream. It’s tasty!

No pickles, though.

from Pickles, Pickles, I Like Pickles book

Illustration from Pickles, Pickles, I Like Pickles

When I celebrated National Pickle Day, I had one student tell me he likes olives in his ice cream when I gave him a coloring page for the picture above. I’m kind of curious if he really does.

Cookbooks for Kids

If you have a little chef at home who would like to do some cooking, you may want to check out some of these cookbooks for kids.

The Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs

Kid Chef Junior: My First Kids’ Cookbook by Anjali Shah

Kid Chef Every Day: The Easy Cookbook for Foodie Kids by Colleen Kennedy

The Usborne Internet-Linked Children’s World Cookbook

Cooking Class: 57 Fun Recipes Kids Will Love to Make (and Eat) by Deanna F. Cook

The Cookbook for Kids: Great Recipes for Kids Who Love to Cook by Lisa Atwood

Super Simple Baking for Kids: Learn to Bake with Over 55 Easy Recipes for Cookies, Muffins, Cupcakes, and More by Charity Mathews

Complete Children’s Cookbook: Delicious Step-by-Step Recipes for Young Cooks

MasterChef Junior Cookbook

The Science Chef: 100 Fun Food Experiments and Recipes for Kids by Joan D’Amico and Karen E. Drummond

This is an older book (c 1994), but my daughters and I (along with a few friends) enjoyed bringing science into the kitchen with the included experiments and recipes. Along with the experiments and recipes to try at home, The Science Chef explains different kitchen tools, measuring techniques, stovetop cooking terms, and safety rules. It also defines various cooking skills such as the difference between chopping, dicing, mincing, and slicing. Perfect for the little scientist who also likes to cook!

What is your favorite recipe?

Check out these posts for more fun with food.

 

 

 

 

Jobs of a Preschooler · Ramblings

Simple Science Experiment: Chemical Reaction

This post contains affiliate links which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on one of the links and make a purchase. Thank you!

My daughters and I continue to do our science lessons using Apologia Exploring Creation with General Science for our science course this year.

We’ve had a lot of fun doing multiple science experiments already using this book. I love how the suggested science experiments use easy-to-find (if not already on hand) supplies. I also like the hands-on approach the science experiments add to the reading.

You can click here if you are interested in seeing the books Apologia offers. Please keep in mind the science books are written from a creationist point of view.

I’ve talked about a couple of the science experiments we have already completed using Apologia Exploring Creation with General Science.

We did a simple science experiment that answered the question: do molecules move faster in cold or hot water.

Does food coloring mix faster in cold water or hot water?

We also did this simple science experiment when we discussed atoms and density.

Simple Science Experiment

I won’t be sharing every science experiment we do along with our current science lessons (there are over 50 of them!); however, today I am showing another simple science experiment we completed during our reading.

This was a neat experiment to show chemical reactions. The science book gives a detailed explanation of what the chemical reactions were, what substances interacted together, and what new substances were formed. I’m not going to get that detailed, but I will still show you what supplies we used and a general idea of the steps we did to complete this experiment.

Supplies

  • clear, empty plastic 2 liter bottle
  • white, distilled vinegar
  • balloon
  • 2 Tbsp baking soda
  • funnel
  • purple cabbage
  • water
  • small pot
  • stove
  • ladle
  • measuring cups (1 c., 3/4 c., 1/2 c.)
  • safety glasses

Directions

  • Boil 2 cups of water in a small pot on the stove with some cabbage leaves. The water should turn purple. Let it cool for a little bit and remove the cabbage leaves.

purple cabbage base

  • Pour 3/4 c. vinegar into 2 liter bottle.

vinegar in bottle

  • Pour about 1/2 c. of the purple cabbage water into the 2 liter bottle using a funnel.

Pouring base into vinegar

  • Notice the color change. The white vinegar and the purple cabbage water made the vinegar (an acid) red.

acid coloring

  • Pour baking soda into the balloon using a dry funnel.
  • Cover the lip of the 2 liter bottle with the balloon’s opening. Make sure the balloon is securely attached.
  • Move the balloon so the baking soda falls into the mixture in the 2 liter bottle.

inflating a balloon with vinegar and baking soda

  • Watch the chemical reaction occur as the mixture fizzes and the balloon gets bigger.

inflating balloon with vinegar and baking soda

  • Eventually, the mixture will stop fizzing.

inflating a balloon with vinegar and baking soda

  • Notice how the red mixture has now turned purple when the baking soda (a base) was added.

Up close base color

It’s as simple as that!

Jobs of a Preschooler- I'm a scientist...

“I’m a scientist…” from the book Jobs of a Preschooler

I ended up buying an entire head of cabbage for this experiment even though it only required a few leaves. As a result, we had quite a bit of cabbage left over.

Similar to when we did our grand pumpkin experiment, I searched online for a recipe so that I could use the left over cabbage pieces.

baked purple cabbage

Who knew that these science lessons would lead to some cooking lessons as well? We ended up sampling some baked cabbage later that day.

from book Jobs of a Preschooler...preschooler being a taste tester

“I’m a taste tester…” from the book Jobs of a Preschooler

What’s your favorite science experiment?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jobs of a Preschooler · Ramblings

Simple Science: Do Molecules Move Faster in Cold Water or Hot Water?

This post contains affiliate links which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on one of the links and make a purchase. Thank you!

As I had mentioned in a previous post, my daughters and I have been using Apologia Exploring Creation with General Science for our science course this year.

The companion student notebooks (I purchased one for each of my daughters) have been very useful. They have an entire section devoted to scientific lab reports that go along with the course. My daughters are required to complete each of the scientific lab reports when we do the experiments.

Scientific Lab Report 1.2(A2)

My daughters have been getting so much practice following the scientific method lately that they even reminded me of it when I recently declared “Our Grand Pumpkin Experiment”.

We have been able to complete all of the recommended science experiments together so far. I’m hoping we will be able to complete them all, but we will see. There are over 50 within this course!

You can find all of the products Apologia has to offer here.

Below is a science experiment we recently completed during our reading on atomic motion.

Does food coloring mix faster in cold water or hot water? 

We gathered the following materials.

  • 2 quart sized canning jars without lids
  • green food coloring
  • small pot of hot water (heated on stove)
  • cold water
  • hot pad
  • funnel
  • eye protection

Then, we completed the steps listed below.

  • Fill one of the canning jars up to the 400 ml line with cold water.
  • Run the other canning jar under warm to hot water from the faucet. (I did this because I was worried the jar would break with the sudden temperature change of the hot water.)
  • Fill the warm canning jar to the 400 ml line with the hot water. Place on hot pad.
  • Put one drop of the food coloring into each jar at the same time.
  • Watch what happens.

Will the molecules move quicker in the hot water or the cold water?

Does food coloring mix faster in cold water or hot water?

The answer is pretty obvious when you look at the picture. The molecules moved quicker in the hot water than the cold water.

Does food coloring mix faster in cold water or hot water?

Another simple, yet fun experiment completed!

Jobs of a Preschooler- I'm a scientist...

“I’m a Scientist…” from Jobs of a Preschooler

Check out these posts for more science fun.