Themed Books · Writing Appearances

22 Children’s Books about Pumpkins

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. I greatly appreciate all purchases you make using these links. Thank you!)

Last month, I shared some apple books that had been listed in a course I created earlier this year entitled Foods and Food Production.

Foods and Food Production

This course, which was published on Schoolhouse Teachers, includes information about 26 different foods and how they are grown, harvested, processed, and used.

Well, now that we are in October, I thought it would be fun to share books based on another food listed in the course. Pumpkins!

pumpkins on deck

Within the pumpkin section of Foods and Food Production, I provided the following:

  • introduction questions for students to answer
  • links to videos showing a pumpkin plant time lapse, an explanation of how pumpkins are harvested, how they grow, and the life cycle of pumpkins
  • lists of books about pumpkins (fiction and nonfiction)
  • more reading about pumpkins with links to other resources
  • a list of the top ten pumpkin producing countries
  • a flag match worksheet with the flags of the top ten pumpkin producing countries
  • information and links to videos that show what products are made with pumpkins
  • three pumpkin recipes to try
  • closing questions for students to discuss what they had learned about pumpkins

Today, I am sharing the lists of books about pumpkins that were included within the course. I was able to check all of these books out from my library.

Fiction Books about Pumpkins

These are the books about pumpkins that were found at my library in the fiction section.

My Pumpkin by Julia Noonan

This book is a My First Reader book that includes a total of 48 different words. It shows a young boy planting seeds in the spring, pulling weeds, watching the pumpkin plant grow, seeing a variety of pumpkin sizes, picking a pumpkin, and going to a pumpkin show to win a prize.

Oh My, Pumpkin Pie! by Charles Ghigna

This is a Step 2 Step into Reading book. It is a rhyming book that shows the varieties, shapes, and sizes of pumpkins and different things that can be made from pumpkins.

P is for Pumpkin: God’s Harvest Alphabet by Kathy-Jo Wargin

This rhyming alphabet picture book goes from A-Z of items found in the fall such as apples, barn, and corn. It reinforces the fact that God made the Earth and everything. It ends with “…may you find every blessing that God’s autumn brings.”

Pumpkin Cat by Anne Mortimer

A little mouse shows Cat how pumpkins grow by planting seeds, watering, waiting, transplanting the little seedling outside, watching, making a scarecrow, picking a pumpkin, and finally making a jack-o-lantern cat. The end of the book provides instructions for how to grow your own pumpkin.

Pumpkin Countdown by Joan Holub

A group of kids is going on a field trip to a pumpkin patch. The book counts down from twenty to one in a fun way and has illustrations for kids to find more pumpkin information and orange items. The illustrations show how pumpkins grow, what bees get from flowers, and different kinds of pumpkins. The book ends with a song to practice counting backwards.

Pumpkin Day! by Candice Ransom

This is a Step 1 Step into Reading book. It is a rhyming book that shows a family going to a pumpkin patch and picking out pumpkins. At home, they turn the pumpkins into jack-o-lanterns.

The Pumpkin Patch by Margaret McNamara

This is a level 1 Ready-to Read book that is part of the Robin Hill School series. The class goes on a field trip to a pumpkin patch, and a little girl named Katie tries to pick out the perfect pumpkin. She chooses a small pumpkin, but she worries her pumpkin may not be perfect until her dad helps her turn the small pumpkin into a pumpkin pie to share with her class.

Nonfiction Books about Pumpkins

These are books about pumpkins I found in the nonfiction section of my library.

A Trip to the Pumpkin Patch by Jenna Lee Gleisner

This has simple text that talks about what you would see at a pumpkin patch including rows of pumpkins, people picking pumpkins, sorting the sizes of pumpkins, face painting, hay rides, and pumpkin treats. It also mentions that people take pumpkins home to make jack-o-lanterns to decorate for Halloween. At the end of the book, there are directions on how to paint a pumpkin.

From Pumpkin to Pie by Lisa Owings

This book tells when pumpkin seeds are planted, how the pumpkin plants grow, when pumpkins are harvested, how pumpkins are prepared for baking, what part of the pumpkin is cooked, and how pumpkin is prepared to make pumpkin pie.

Grow a Pumpkin Pie! by Jane E. Gerver

This book is a Hello Reader book that shows the process of planting seeds and growing pumpkins to make a pumpkin pie. The end of the book provides a sorting activity, matching activity, pumpkin patch maze, rhyming activity, and drawing activity.

Grow It Yourself!: Grow Your Own Soup by John Malam

This book talks about what a pumpkin is, different kids and sizes of pumpkins, how pumpkins grow, steps to plant and grow your own pumpkins, taking care of a pumpkin plant, and a recipe for pumpkin soup and pumpkin seeds.

Harvest to Home: Pumpkins by Lynn M. Stone

This book talks about what pumpkins can be used in, the variety of pumpkin sizes and shapes, pulp, pumpkins being processed for pumpkin paste, growing pumpkins, pollen, bees helping, and harvesting pumpkins.

How Did That Get to my Table?: Pumpkin Pie by Emily J. Dolbear

This book talks about how pumpkin pie requires pumpkins that grow on vines. It discusses how the seeds are planted, when they are harvested, what happens at the factory, how pumpkin pie is made, and how pies get in stores.

In a Pumpkin Shell: Over 20 Pumpkin Projects for Kids by Jennifer Storey Gillis

This book offers 20 pumpkin activities to do with kids such as making your own pumpkin patch, painting a pumpkin, making a pumpkin seed necklace, carving a pumpkin, and cooking various pumpkin recipes that are provided.

Life Cycle of a Pumpkin by Ron Fridell and Patricia Walsh

This book talks about what a pumpkin is, different stages of pumpkin maturation in step-by-step details, pollination, ripening, pumpkin problems, pests, harvesting, possibilities for pumpkins after they are harvested, the pumpkin life cycle in pictures, and pumpkin facts.

Pumpkin Circle: The Story of a Garden by George Levenson

This book offers actual photographs instead of illustrations. It discusses seeds and the pumpkin plants as they grow. It shows closeups of the large leaves, twisty tendrils, flower buds, little hairs, blossoms, and a bee, spider, and grasshopper on the pumpkin plant. After picking the pumpkin, it shows a pumpkin with seeds rotting into the ground and producing a new pumpkin plant. The end offers more information on how to grow pumpkins.

Pumpkin Harvest by Calvin Harris

Simple text that talks about fall being pumpkin season and shows pumpkins growing, vines drying, farmers picking pumpkins, and pumpkins being turned into jack-o-lanterns and pie.

Pumpkin Pumpkin by Jeanne Titherington

Simple text talks about a young child who planted a pumpkin seed and watched it grow until it produced a large pumpkin. The child picks the pumpkin, carves a face, and saves some seeds to plant another time.

Seed, Sprout, Pumpkin, Pie by Jill Esbaum

This book goes through the steps of pumpkin plants growing starting with seeds being planted and leading to pumpkins of many colors, shapes, and sizes. Even giant pumpkins you can sit inside! It also tells what pumpkins can be made into.

See It Grow: Pumpkin by Jackie Lee

This book shows a seed progressing into a pumpkin plant with vocabulary words such as true leaves, seed leaves, shoot, roots, and nutrients. It also has pumpkin facts such as “a pumpkin vine can grow 30 feet long.”

The Pumpkin Book by Gail Gibbons

This book has illustrations instead of actual photographs and talks about the different shapes and sizes of pumpkins, how fields are prepared, what seeds have within them, how seeds are planted, what is needed for the seed to grow, the different stages of the pumpkin plant, the parts of the flower, pollination, the amount of time it takes to grow, history of pumpkins with Pilgrims and Native Americans, a history of Halloween, how to carve and decorate pumpkins, and other pumpkin facts.

The Pumpkin Patch: Story and Photographs by Elizabeth King

This book talks about and shows pictures of the work done in a pumpkin patch before pumpkin seeds are planted, where pumpkin seeds come from and what they look like (coated with a pink powder), how the plants grow, how they are harvested, and what pumpkins can look like.

For more fun with pumpkins, check out Our Grand Pumpkin Experiment from last year.

If you would like to look at more books with themes, check out these posts:

Themed Books

22 Children’s Books with Surprise Endings

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. I greatly appreciate all purchases you make using these links. Thank you!)

I get together with a group of writers once a month to discuss various topics pertaining to children’s books and writing. Oftentimes, we use recent published children’s books as reference. Well, this month, we decided to discuss children’s books with surprise endings.

Tip: If you want to write children’s books, you must read recent children’s books!

I prepared for the meeting by finding multiple books that supposedly had surprise endings. Oddly, the first three or four books my daughters and I read together involved someone or something being eaten as the “surpise ending”.

Here are most of the books with surprise endings that I was able to check out from my library and read. Just a word of caution: You may want to read them ahead of time on your own before reading them to the little ones in your life because some of them were a little disturbing for a young child (in my opinion).

Children’s Books with Surprise Endings

Charlotte and the Rock by Stephen W. Martin

Charlotte finally gets a pet of her own…a pet rock. But is it really just a rock?

Egg Drop by Mini Grey

An egg couldn’t wait to fly. Unfortunately, it attempts to fly. As you know, eggs don’t really fly…or do they? (Spoiler alert: The egg doesn’t fly. It shatters just like its dream of flying, which I found quite depressing for a children’s book.)

I am a Tiger by Karl Newson

Mouse insists he is a tiger until he realizes he is something else. What could that something else be?

It’s Great Being a Dad by Dan Bar-el

Children with great imaginations pretend to be a unicorn (who gets her horn stuck), Bigfoot (who gets his foot stuck), a robot (who has stuck hinges), the Loch Ness Monster, a fairy queen ballerina doctor, and a sneaky flying alligator pirate (who steals the magic wand). Who will save the day?

Polar Bear’s Underwear by Tupera Tupera

Polar Bear doesn’t know where his underwear has gone. He finds many other pairs of underwear, but they are all already being worn by his friends. Where will Polar Bear find his underwear?

Poor Little Guy by Elanna Allen

Will the poor little guy successfully be eaten? The answer may surprise you!

Tadpole’s Promise by Jeanne Willis

A tadpole and caterpillar love each other, but tadpole keeps breaking his promise that he will never change as he slowly transforms into a frog. The caterpillar leaves upset and ends up changing into a butterfly. When she emerges as the butterfly, she decides to give her tadpole (whom she really loves) another chance. Neither she nor the tadpole (which is now a full grown frog) recognizes each other as the butterfly spots the frog. What do you think will happen when the hungry frog sees a butterfly he doesn’t realize is his lovely caterpillar?

Spoiler alert: Frog eats the love of his life without realizing it and spends the rest of his time wondering where his lovely caterpillar could be.

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach

Did a bear really eat your sandwich? And who is claiming that a bear really ate your sandwich to begin with? I thought this was a cute story.

The Giant Jumperee by Julia Donaldson

All the animals are afraid of “The Giant Jumperee” until one brave Mama Frog shows up. Who is the Giant Jumperee scaring all of the animals?

Toto’s Apple by Mathieu Lavoie

Toto is a worm determined to get the apple. Toto makes many unsuccessful attempts until he finally gets the apple he wants. Unfortunately, the apple isn’t the only thing to get eaten.

Don’t Wake up the Tiger by Britta Teckentrup

Why don’t the animals want the tiger to wake up? What happens if the tiger does wake up?

Eat Pete by Michael Rex

A monster wants to eat a young child named Pete. After having a lot of fun playing with Pete, the Monster finally gives in and (spoiler alert) actually eats the child. But, the monster realizes he isn’t having as much fun on his own. Thankfully, he is able to spit the child back out.

Life on Mars by Jon Agee

A young boy is determined he will find life on Mars. He goes home thinking he is successful, but is he really?

Pardon Me by Daniel Miyares

A bird demands to be alone on what he thinks is a rock. But is it really a rock, and who will get eaten?

This Book Will Not be Fun by Cirocco Dunlap

A mouse is quite adamant that the book will not be fun. Is he right?

You Don’t Want a Unicorn by Ame Dyckman

And why don’t you want a unicorn? For starters, they wreak a lot of havoc.

Good Little Wolf by Nadia Shireen

Good Little Wolf proves he is really a good little wolf but that’s not enough to transform Big Bad Wolf into a good wolf. Big Bad Wolf claims he will stop eating people…tomorrow (after he has already eaten a person).

I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean by Kevin Sherry

Is he really the biggest thing in the ocean? Or is there something even bigger in the ocean that will eat him?

I Want my Hat Back by Jon Klassen

Bear can’t find his hat but realizes he saw his hat on the head of rabbit. But how will he get his hat back? Spoiler alert: Bears eat rabbits (especially those who steal hats)!

The Baby that Roared by Simon Puttock

Mr. and Mrs. Deer really wanted a baby. One day they find a baby on their doorstep, but they don’t know what to do with the “peculiar” baby, so they invite Uncle Duncan (an owl), Auntie Agnes (a bunny), and Dr. Fox over to help with the new baby. Each of them mysteriously disappears, though, until Granny Bear shows up and burps the baby. Will Mr. and Mrs. Deer keep what they have discovered is a little monster?

After the Fall: How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again by Dan Santat

Humpty Dumpty may have been physically put together by the king’s men, but he was emotionally scarred after “The Great Fall”. His new fear of heights kept him from enjoying his favorite things, and he is miserable until “an idea flew by”. Humpty Dumpty finally finds something that makes him happy again and decides to conquer his fear of heights. But what happens once he gets back to the top of the wall?

The Monster at the end of this Book by Jon Stone

And finally…the book at the end of this list. I had completely forgotten about this one (even though I own it) until someone at my writer’s meeting mentioned it. The Monster at the end of this Book is my favorite out of all of these books listed.

Grover pleads with the reader to not turn the pages of the book. He tries (unsuccessfully) to stop the reader from turning the pages because he is afraid of the monster at the end of the book. Who is the monster at the end of the book? That’s an answer that may even surprise Grover!

What makes a surpise ending in a children’s book a surprise ending? Do you have a favorite?

 

For more themed books, check out:

Nonfiction Picture Books for Kids

14 Children’s Books About Teachers

5 Interactive Educational Children’s Books

25 Books About Grandparents

Themed Books

The Truth About…Children’s Book Series

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. I greatly appreciate all purchases you make using these links. Thank you!)

A local picture book group had a meeting recently to discuss nature themed books. Unfortunately, I was unable to attend the meeting, but I still read the books that had been included on the list to discuss.

My favorite book from the list was The Truth About Bears, which I was really excited to find is part of a series. Of course, I had to see if the library had the rest of the series for me to read.

And they did have most of them! Here are the books that are part of The Truth About… book series.

The Truth About…Books

The Truth About Bears

Read this book to learn interesting facts about bears in a fun format. I think it is a common misconception that polar bears and penguins live in the same area, so I really liked the page where the polar bear is trying to show a penguin where he lives on a globe and the penguin says “Never heard of it.” The book also points out the fact that koalas are not bears in a fun way. The part about what bears eat made me laugh. What are rodents? The last few pages include facts on bear safety (again in a fun tone) and additional information.

The Truth About Crocodiles

Read this book to find more information about crocodilians including crocodiles, aligators, caimans, and the gharial in a fun format. Did you know “some crocs put sticks on their snouts to attract birds building nests”? Pretty clever! There is some information about how to stay safe in croc territory and additional facts included in the back of the book.

The Truth About Dolphins

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to check this one out from my local library, but I am assuming it talks about dolphins (or porpoises) in a fun format.

The Truth About Elephants 

Learn about the largest animals on land, how to tell the difference between Asian elephants and African elephants, what elephants use their trunks for, how many teeth they have (I was surpised by this fact), who is in their herds, how they communicate long distances, what they do when threatened, and why humans are their biggest threat all while reading this book.

Just a side note: I know that not everyone agrees the earth is millions of years old, so I just wanted to say that one page does state “elephants evolved over millions of years with similar (now extinct) animals.”

The Truth About Hippos

Read this book to find fun facts about hippos told in a fun format. Learn the difference between a common hippo and a pygmy hippo, how much they weigh, what they eat, how far they can open their mouths, a “fun fact” about what they do when they go to the bathroom, and more. Also, did you know “hippos can’t actually swim”? Additional facts about hippos are included in the back of the book.

What other animal would you like to see as a part of this series?

 

For more themed books, check out:

14 Children’s Books About Flowers

14 Children’s Books About Teachers

14 Children’s Books About Seeds, Plants, and Gardening

Nonfiction Picture Books for Kids

Themed Books · Writing Appearances

21 Children’s Books About Apples

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. I greatly appreciate all purchases you make using these links. Thank you!)

Earlier this year, I created a course for Schoolhouse Teachers called Foods and Food Production, which included information about 26 different foods and how they are grown, harvested, processed, and used.

Foods and Food Production

One of the sections included in the course is a great theme for this time of year. Apples!

Within the apple section, I provided the following:

  • introduction questions for students to answer
  • links to videos that show a tour of an apple orchard, how apples grow, how apples are harvested, and how they are packed in a facility
  • a list of apple books to read
  • information about apple seeds and the life cycle of apple trees
  • a link to an apple coloring book
  • a list of the top ten apple producing countries and states
  • links to videos that show how apple sauce, apple juice, and apple cider are made
  • three recipes that include apples as an ingredient
  • closing questions for students to answer as a recap of what was learned throughout the lesson

Today, I am sharing some of the books about apples that are listed within the course. These are all books I was able to check out from my library.

children's books about apples

Nonfiction Books about Apples

These are the books about apples I found in the nonfiction section of my library.

An Apple Tree’s Life Cycle by Mary Dunn

This book discusses the number of apple tree kinds, the life cycle of an apple tree starting with a seed and progressing through the different seasons, and pollination by bees.

Apple Harvest by Calvin Harris

Simple text talks about how apples are ready to be picked in the fall, how the apples are picked, treats apples can be turned into, and asks what other signs show the season of fall.

Apple Harvest by Jenna Lee Gleisner

Simple text talks about apples being picked in the fall and the treats apples can be turned into. There is a recipe for Apple Pizza at the end of the book.

Apples by Gail Gibbons

This book discusses the history of apples, John Chapman, the parts of an apple, the parts of a flower, pollination, the process of apples growing, products that can be made with apples, some common apples found in North America, how to care for an apple tree, an apple pie recipe, how apple cider is made, and some apple facts without a lot of text.

Additional Note To Parents: This book does state that apple trees have been in existence for two million years.

Apples by Cynthia Klingel and Robert B. Noyed

This is a level one reader book that simply states the variety of colors apples can be, how apples grow, when they are picked, and a couple of treats apples can be used in.

Apples by Jacqueline Farmer

This book has quite a few words. It discusses how apples are grown, the parts of an apple blossom, pollination, when apples are ready to harvest, some varieties of apples, how apple cider is made, the difference between apple cider and apple juice, how to store apples, nutrition of apples, and the history of apples including information about Roman beliefs, the folktale of William Tell, and the true story of Johnny Appleseed. The end of the book includes a recipe for apple pie and more apple facts and records.

Additional note to parents: Under the apple history section, it states “most apple historians believe that sweet apples were cultivated…around 6500 BCE.”

Apples by Ken Robbins

This book also has quite a few words. It discusses how apples are grown, picked, and used as an ingredient in a variety of recipes. At the end, it shows nine different apple varieties.

Apples, Apples Everywhere! by Robin Koontz

This book shows a family visiting an apple orchard and seeing the different colors of apples, the different sizes of apples, workers picking and storing apples, apple worms (moth caterpillars), an apple game, and apple cider. There are directions at the end of the book for making a dried apple wreath.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bite into an Apple by Lynn Brunelle

This book has quite a bit of text. It talks about where apples come from, why apples bruise, how apples must be stored, different varieties of apples, how apples are transported to stores, how apples are processed into applesauce, how to use acid such as lemon juice to keep an apple from browning quickly, difference between apple juice and apple cider, how apples are packaged, what to do with a bruised apple, how apples are tested, how apples are picked, a technique for ripening apples faster once picked, how to prevent bugs from eating apple trees, how to keep apple trees healthy, how apples form, pollination, grafting, Johnny Appleseed, and more apple facts.

Additional note: This book does not include a link because I couldn’t find it on Amazon, but I was able to find it at my local library.

From Apples to Applesauce by Kristin Thoennes Keller

This book talks about applesauce, where apples are grown, how apples are picked by hand, how apples are packed and sent to factories, how apples are processed into applesauce and sealed into containers at the factories, where applesauce can be found, and grafting. There is a recipe for homemade applesauce at the end of the book.

How Do Apples Grow? by Betsy Maestro

This book is part of the Let’s-Read-And-Find Out Science series and is a detailed explanation of how fertilization takes place to create apples. It talks about the blossoms, how flowers become apples, animal helpers such as bees, the different parts of the flowers, how the flowers are fertilized, what is inside of an apple, a few varieties of apples, and picking apples.

Additional note: If you want to read this book but can’t find it in your library and don’t want to purchase it, you can watch and listen as it is being read in this video (7:57).

Let’s Cook with Apples!: Delicious & Fun Apple Dishes Kids Can Make by Nancy Tuminelly

This book has some apple history, cooking safety, cooking basics, measurements, cooking terms, what kinds of apples to use for different recipes, tools in the kitchen, ingredients, and some apple recipes to try including an apple-wich, apple sundae, pickled apples, apple chips, apple salsa, and more.

Life on an Apple Orchard by Judy Wolfman

This book has quite a bit of text. It is told from the point of view of a girl who lives on an apple orchard with her family. The book discusses the apple trees, working on the orchard, planting seedlings, the process of grafting (without saying “grafting”), helpful and not-so-helpful bugs, bees, blossoms, pollination, picking apples, grading apples, storing apples, and fun facts about apples.

Out and About at the Apple Orchard by Diane Mayr

This book is about a group of kids going on a field trip to an apple orchard. Before going, they put together a list of questions they would like to answer. While on the field trip, they learn when apples ripen, why there is so much space in between the apple trees, honeybees, what trees need to grow, what compost is, how to prevent pests and what pests are, how apples are picked, packed, and stored, the differences between apple cider and apple juice, products apples can be made into, and fun facts about apples. There is also a floating fruit experiment at the end of the book.

See it Grow: Apple by Dawn Bluemel Oldfield

This book has simple text that shows the parts of an apple tree as it grows starting from a seed, how the apples change as they ripen, the parts of an apple, and some apple facts.

The Life and Times of the Apple by Charles, Micucci

This book is very detailed. It talks about the life of an apple, the parts of an apple, how apple trees are planted, cross-fertilization, grafting, apple blossoms, parts of the blossom, honeybees, how honeybees pollinate apple flowers, how apples grow, how and when apples are harvested, types of apple trees, uses of apples, the amount of apples grown each year, some of the apple varieties, history of apples, Johnny Appleseed, and more apple facts.

Additional note to parents: This book states “apples have been growing on earth for over two and a half million years” and shows a time line depicting millions of years.

The Zieglers and Their Apple Orchard by Alice K. Flanagan

This book talks about the jobs a couple has on their apple orchard, the stages the apple trees go through, honeybees, spraying with chemicals, mowing the grass, checking the trees and apples, having guests visit the orchard, and selling apple items. Some of the pages are a little hard to read due to the color of the text on the pictures.


Who Was Johnny Appleseed? By Joan Holub

This book is part of the Who Was series and tells the true story of John Chapman, also known as Johnny Appleseed.

Fiction Books About Apples

These are the books about apples I found in the fiction section of my library.

Apples to Oregon: Being the (Slightly) True Narrative of How a Brave Pioneer Father Brought Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Grapes, and Cherries (and Children) Across the Plains by Deborah Hopkinson and Nancy Carpenter

A Daddy decides to move from Iowa to Oregon with his large family, so he loads a large box filled with dirt, little plants, and trees on to the back of a wagon. Along the way, there are many challenges (such as a river, bad weather, and a hot desert). Other people think the plants will never make it across the long journey, but Daddy is determined (and maybe a little obsessed) to make it. With the help of the entire family, the plants safely arrive in Oregon and are planted. There is a map at the beginning of the book that shows the progress from Salem, Iowa to Milwaukee, Oregon. The Author’s Note includes information about a real pioneer who travelled a great distance with hundreds of plants and young fruit trees.

Apple Picking Day! by Candice Ransom

This is a Step 1 Step Into Reading book that shows a family traveling to an apple orchard, taking a tractor ride, picking apples, sorting apples by color, and seeing some items made from apples.

Fancy Nancy Apples Galore by Jane O’Connor

This is a Level 1 I Can Read book about Fancy Nancy taking a field trip to an apple orchard with her class. Her friend, Lionel, continuously pretends that something is wrong forcing Ms. Glass, the teacher, to come to his aid and “reprimand” him. When Lionel gets stuck in a tree, other kids think it is another one of Lionel’s jokes, so Nancy finds a ladder to help Lionel. Ms. Glass comes to help Nancy get Lionel out of the tree when she sees what is happening, and Lionel is disciplined for not listening.

Will you read any books about apples today?

For more themed children’s books, check out these posts:

Ramblings · Themed Books

Nonfiction Picture Books for Kids

(This post contains affiliate links, which means I may make a small commission at no extra charge to you if you click on a link and make a purchase. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. I greatly appreciate all purchases you make using these links. Thank you!)

Last year, I attended an SCBWI nonfiction conference and learned quite a bit about writing nonfiction books for children.

This year, I’m excited for the opportunity to attend another SCBWI Adventures in Nonfiction conference featuring Senior Editor Carolyn Yoder and authors Jacqueline Briggs Martin and Miranda Paul.

Adventures in Nonfiction Part 2

You can find more information about the upcoming nonfiction conference on the SCBWI Iowa website here. Registration is now open for it!

Just like I did last year, I decided to read some books written by the authors who will be presenting at the conference. Even though Jacqueline Briggs Martin and Miranda Paul have published many books, these are the books I was able to check out from my local library.

Nonfiction Books by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Jacqueline Briggs Martin will be discussing picture book biographies at the conference. Here are some of the nonfiction picture books written by her that I was able to find at my local library.

Alice Waters and the Trip to Delicious (Readers to Eaters, 2014)

This is a picture book biography about Alice Waters who was on a mission to make delicious meals to share with others using fresh foods. She started Chez Panisse, had the opportunity to cook for a U.S. president, won the James Beard Award for “Outstanding Chef of the Year”, started the Edible Schoolyard Project, and wants others to learn about growing fresh food for themselves.

Chef Roy Choi and the Street Food Remix (Readers to Eaters, 2017)

This is a picture book biography about Chef Roy Choi who calls himself a “street cook”. Roy Choi was born in Korea but has spent most of his life in Los Angeles. Searching for his path in life wasn’t easy for him, but he finally discovered his passion and joy by cooking for others out of a truck. His Korean barbecue in a taco was a success! He started Kogi, opened cafes, and opened a soulful fast food restaurant called Locol. He wants to show others the deliciousness of cooking with love.

Creekfinding: A True Story (University of Minnesota Press, 2017)

This is a true story about a man named Michael Osterholm who was on a mission to find a creek that had been covered with fields in Iowa. Through much work, dedication, and time, he was finally able to restore the creek. Now, instead of a field, the creek is flowing and filled with lots of wildlife.

I found it interesting that this true story took place less than an hour away from where my family once lived.


Farmer Will Allen and the Growing Table (Readers to Eaters, 2013)

This is a picture book biography about Will Allen who went from playing professional basketaball in Belgium to becoming a farmer in the middle of the city of Milwaukee. He started Growing Power farm, and he now grows many fruits and vegetables, raises red wigglers, and shows others how they can farm in cities. Thousands of people each year continue to visit his farm in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to “tour the greenhouses, watch goats, snack on greens, and go home planning to start a farm on a city lot, rooftop, or abandoned highway.”

This was another book that I found interesting due to the location of the story because I lived in southeast Wisconsin for quite a few years and was just in that area again recently.

Snowflake Bentley (Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998)

This picture book biography is about photographer Wilson Bentley (who became known as “Snowflake Bentley”) who lived from 1865 to 1931. He was intrigued by snowflakes and wanted to find a way to capture their beauty to share with others. His “parents spent their savings and bought the camera” Wilson Bentley wanted in order for him to pursue his dreams. Through a lot of patience, dedication, and creativity, Wilson Bentley discovered ways to capture the beauty of snowflakes on film. He enjoyed showing others his photographs and even had a book published with his snowflake photos.

The book states: “By 1926 he had spent $15,000 on his work and received $4,000 from the sale of photographs and slides.” That seemed like a lot of money for 1926, so my daughters and I Googled what that would be equivalent to in 2019 dollars. According to this inflation calculator, $15,000 would be equivalent to $217,070.34 and $4,000 would be equivalent to $57,885.42.

My family also watched this Youtube video after reading Snowflake Bentley to see some of Wilson Bentley’s beautiful snowflake photographs. It is quite amazing what he was able to do with the technology of that time!

The Chiru of High Tibet (Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, 2010

This is a true story about trying to save the chiru species. Chiru are animals that “look like antelope” and live in “the northern plains of Tibet”. They had once been very plentiful in that area but their population was significantly depleted when people started killing them to make shawls. For many years, no one knew where the chiru birthing ground was located. A man named George Schaller and four mountain climbing men took the initiative and (more than) one journey to find the location and ask the Chinese government to protect that land from hunters.

Nonfiction and Informational Fiction Books by Miranda Paul

Miranda Paul will be talking about creative nonfiction and informational fiction picture books at the upcoming conference. Here are the nonfiction and informational fiction picture books by her that I was able to find at my local library.

Adventures to School: Real-Life Journeys of Students from Around the World (Little Bee Books, 2018)

This nonfiction picture book written with Baptiste Paul describes the journeys children from thirteen different nations must take in order to get to school along with additional information about each of the nations.

It’s amazing to read what some of these children must endure in order to get to school. My daughters are truly blessed to be able to simply walk down the stairs to start school each morning.

Are We Pears Yet? (Roaring Brook Press, 2017)

This is an informational fiction picture book. Two pear seeds perform a play about the life cycle of pear seeds. The young pear seed is eager to become a pear but learns it first needs soil, rain, sun, and long naps (more than 2 years of naps) to grow into trees at which point the pear seeds need a costume change. Pears finally appear on the trees and an x-ray reveals two pear seeds within one of the pears. Extra facts about pears are given at the end of the book.

Nine Months Before a Baby is Born (Holiday House, 2019)

This picture book told in a poetic style goes through the process of a baby forming and growing before birth. Backmatter offers more information about the different stages of development.

One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia (Millbrook Press, 2015)

This nonfiction picture book tells the story of how a young woman named Isatou Ceesay took the iniative to make Njau, Gambia beautiful again after plastic bags had accumulated in the area causing unwanted water, mosquitoes, disease, and dying goats. With help from some other women, the bags were cleaned and transformed into beautiful hand-crocheted purses, which could be sold to others.

Water is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle (Roaring Brook Press, 2015)

I found this book in the fiction section at my library, but it is informational since it discusses the water cycle in poetic form. The backmatter found at the end of the book offers additional information about water including words like evaporation, condensation, precipitation, seepage, and more.

Fun Fiction Picture Books by Miranda Paul

Here are the some fun fiction picture books written by Miranda Paul that I found at my local library.

10 Little Ninjas (Knopf Books for Young Readers, 2016)

Told in the same fashion as “10 Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed”, this picture book has 10 little ninjas, 9 tiny astronauts, 8 rapid racers, 7 prowling tigers, 6 rowdy cowboys, 5 hungry reef sharks, 4 thirsty firefighters, 3 quiet pirates, 2 sleepy dragons, 1 little cuddlebug, and finally 10 sleeping kids.

The Great Pasta Escape (Little Bee Books, 2017)

This fiction picture book filled with humor and pasta puns is about noodles in a factory that were content following the rules until they discovered they were made to be eaten. After examining all of the evidence and confirming this was true, they strategized an escape plan together.

Mia Moves Out (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018)

Mia decides the obvious solution to her brother taking over her room is to move out. So, begins her journey of finding a new place to stay. The bathroom, basement, and cupboard prove to be bad choices. She finally finds a place she likes but realizes it’s missing something (really someone – her brother). That’s when she comes up with the idea of creating a fort for her and her brother to enjoy together outside.

Trainbots (Little Bee Books, 2016)

This rhyming picture book is about trainbots becoming hero-bots to get rid of the evil badbots, so they can deliver toybots to kidbots. How a-bot that description?

Reading all of these books makes me really excited for the upcoming SCBWI Adventures in Nonfiction Conference. Which book is your favorite?